A unique approach to Instagram Marketing with Talking Food

Aug 5 • Front Page, Instagram, Social Media • 2621 Views

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The English language is full of potential puns, especially when it comes to food. Laura Prouty, the brains behind @talkingfood on Instagram, is a genius when it comes to pairing some of our favorite foods with silly English-language puns and pop culture references. This unique approach is a hit with fans, and a tactic that big brands should consider when trying to make their voices heard above all the marketing clamor that tends to overwhelm and turn off the masses.

 

It all started when Laura bought a bag of five unripe avocados. A few days passed and the avocados eventually ripened, but Laura couldn’t help but obsess over the little beauties until they were ready to eat. It was then that she realized her love for avocados was “avocontrol.” Her clever pun brought on the giggles and Talking Food was born.

 

Each of Laura’s puns/memes/play on words is tied to an original photograph. Laura and photographers Rob Grimm and Gary Martin of RGG Photo joined forces in 2013 to make Talking Food what it is today.

 

If you watch a lot of TV and movies, you’ll understand many of Talking Food’s references. First up is a winner for fans of Doctor Who and Dr. Pepper. Do you get a kick out of this pun?

 

 

This one isn’t even a play on words; it’s just a pop culture reference to Liz Lemon, the main character on 30 Rock. Like Liz, this lemon is socially awkward, cynical and hilarious.

 

 

You know nothing, Jon Snowpea. Game of Thrones, anyone? Anyone?

 

 

Music is a big part of the American lifestyle. We’re almost always listening to tunes, whether we’re at home, at work, at school or in the car. You’ll understand this reference whether you’re a fan or a critic of DJ Snake’s “Turn Down for What.”

 

 

Three 6 Mafia fans, this one should make you smile. It’s hard out here – for a shrimp?

 

 

And referencing an old classic by Ray Charles: Hit the Road, Flapjack…and don’t you come flapback no more, no more, no more, no more.

 

 

Shel Silverstein wrote the poem “A Boy Named Sue,” which Johnny Cash popularized by recording it in 1969. Life ain’t easy for a boy named Sue, but how about a boy named Soufflé?

 

 

Sometimes popular sayings take off and become an integrated part of popular culture. YOLO, or you only live once, is one thing, but what about YOROLO? After all, you only ROLO once.

 

 

Popularized by Andrew Meyer, the University of Florida student who was forcibly removed from a Q & A session with Senator John Kerry, Talking Foods makes us giggle with “Don’t maize me, bro!”

 

 

This one pretty much sums up everything Talking Foods is about: Can’t we all just get along?

 

 

 

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