Art made with Code

Jul 3 • Culture • 2222 Views

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Computer Code is a special digital language made up of words, letters and other symbols to instruct computer programs. Imagining technology as a canvas and code as a paintbrush, Google and Barbican commissioned three artists to create art, using code, for the Digital Revolution Exhibition, an immersive exhibition of art, design, film, music and videogames that debuts today through September 14 in London.

 

Play the World by Zach Lieberman

Visitors can perform with a keyboard that searches for samples of the same note from web radio stations from around the world.

 

Co(de) Factory by Karsten Smith

A multifaceted creative vision that allows visitors to become an artist with an online design tool that creates 3D digital sculptures.

 

Wishing Wall by Varvara Gulijajeva and Mar Canet

Spoken words are transformed into a variety of colorful butterflies, and visitors can interact with the butterflies, by catching them or letting them land on their arm … thereby releasing the wish.

 

Google and Barbican also put out a worldwide call to interactive artists, resulting in hundreds of entries. The winner of that group was Les Metamorphoses de Mr. Kalia, which uses your own body’s movements to control a larger-than-life animated character, creating an impressive visual performance using simple movement. This was created by Cyril Diagne and Beatrice Lartigue.

 

In an attempt to inspire a new generation of coders and artists, Google is also kicking off a set of workshops called the DevArt Young Creators program for students 9-13 years old who have never tried coding before. Each workshop will be turned into a lesson plan and distributed to educators. It’s an excellent way for educators to give their students a newfound appreciation of coding’s power and creative possibilities.

 

If you aren’t able to visit the Barbican in London, don’t worry, this exhibit will go on tour around the world for five years and you can view it online:

 

 

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