How Larger Phone Screens are Changing Media Consumption

Oct 8 • Business, Social Media Marketing • 1503 Views

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Is the iPhone 6 going to change the way consumers relate to media? Always an industry leader, Apple is on the cusp once again, with “phablet” phones, measuring much larger than what we’ve come to regard as standard. Are consumers on board? It seems they are, and content providers are jumping on the bandwagon as well.

 

If you think about it, these phones are just encouraging the trend we’ve already noticed across all sorts of media. Everything seems to start smaller with all text, but then the visuals become larger and more prominently featured, and there’s less text involved. It’s not surprising that Apple, largely regarded as the authority in mobile technology, would market phones geared toward this image intensive trend. Apple’s not the only one doing it, of course, as phones across the market have been steadily increasing in size.

 

As indicated by immediate sales, consumers like these new larger sizes. What’s not to like? You can watch Netflix on the bus, play games in the waiting room, and basically take your media with you wherever you go, on a device you’d have with you anyway. It’s all led to a huge jump in mobile use and video traffic – 532% year over year increase between 2012 and 2014 – and it isn’t just an American phenomenon, either. Take a look at how consumers across the globe are using their phones to feed their media addictions:

 

Big-screen-smartphone-demand

Source: Digiday.com

 

These numbers are only going to get bigger, and content providers are all over it. Of course, it’s a bit of a chicken-or-the-egg scenario: users want mobile content, phones become bigger to accommodate all this content, and the content becomes more readily available to keep up with the demand generated by the bigger phones. Still, it’s a savvy company that recognizes the potential. Netflix, for example, announced last week that it plans to chop videos into shorter clips for the sake of mobile users. Short-form video is all the rage among mobile viewers, and video makers across the board are embracing the trend, as everyone from Sports Illustrated to AOL churns out their own video snacks.

 

What does it mean for the average social media marketer? While there’s not really a need for immediate change, it’s good to note that marketing trends are blowing in the direction of larger visual delivery, with less text and more images and video. Does that resonate with you? How will this shift impact your marketing strategies in the future?

 

 

top photo by Hadrian / Shutterstock.com

 

 

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