Find Brand Advocates in Twitter Chats

Sep 19 • Social Media, Twitter • 1661 Views

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Adweek asked a question during their Twitter chat last week that seemed to shed light on something that brands have only assumed to know.

 

 

Based on the slew of responses to the question, I found three key takeaways.

 

1)      Gen Y is really sensitive to seeing brands on Facebook. The immense amount of shade that was thrown at Facebook during this portion of the chat confirms my personal belief that their future is in the hands of millennials. It’s not looking good.

2)      Consumers really enjoy seeing brands on up-and-coming platforms. Instagram seems to be the next medium brands are expected to be on, but it’s actually exciting to a user to see a company they like on Snapchat or Vine. These apps have gone unexplored by many companies, and the lack of data seems intimidating. It may be worth the risk to step out of the safety zone while there’s still a chance to stand out.

3)      People love to be recognized by brands on Twitter. One Adweek chatter said:

 

 

This goes to show the huge opportunity being missed by brands – not because they’re not hosting Twitter chats, and not because they’re not seeking chats out; they’re missing opportunities to join conversations they’re being invited to.

 

Dozens of brands are tagged in numerous Twitter chats every. single. day. Yet too many of those brands are not responding, and when they do respond, they often forget to use the hashtag designated for that chat.

 

What this means:

As a brand, your advocates are confessing their love for you to a group of “friends.” While other companies are dying to know who their advocates are on social, you have one bragging about you. That’s a fan. That’s exposure. That’s lasting potential impressions, engagements and new customers all because you were able to make this person feel special by replying to them in front of their friends while using the appropriate hashtag.

 

Charmin and Cinnabon performed perfectly during last week’s #AdWeekChat. Their fans called, they came running, cracked a few jokes, followed some people and left with more followers than they started with. To be honest, chatters who previously liked the brand probably walked away loving them because of the 30 minutes they took to chat with their advocates.

 

 

 

 

Isn’t that what we’re always preaching about? 2014 was the year that brands finally understood that social media was to make brands, well, social. So, there it is. The easiest way to be a social brand is Twitter chats. Now go convert likers into lovers before consumers become jaded and unimpressed by brands talking to them on Twitter.

 

 

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